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Herefordshire Folklore

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Why were rabbits associated with trickery in mythology and folklore?
Does anyone know anything about the folklore and history of Ettrick Forest near Selkirk in Scotland?
What is the abbreviation for Herefordshire?
Heref.I've always used HFDS
What is the distance from Newport gwent to herefordshire?
What is the Folklore for New Zealand?
How is folklore spread?
What is musical folklore?
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Herefordshire pub guide: The Stagg Inn, Titley, Herefordshire
Herefordshire
Herefordshire Council
The caravan of folklore
Herefordshire: The English quotient
Herefordshire: Walk of the month
AC
Getting serious about folklore
For the love of folklore
From cyberlaws to folklore
A celebration of folklore
The A to Z of Kannada folklore
Course in folklore studies
[02-10] What a great day for Herefordshire .#AutismHour #Herefordshire @CLFHereford1 @HTnewsroom @SunshineRadio @Autism @HfdCityC
[02-12] Estudiar, y folklore @00_florencia una tarde muy diferente #Folklore #folklorethursday #folkloreArgentino
[09-12] #FolkloreThursday #Folklore I love @terriwindling ‘s site for all my folklore.
[30-10] 'Black Dog Folklore' by Mark Norman. A comprehensive study of the image of the Black Dog in folklore. #Devon #exeter #
[15-08] 'Herefordshire is just as lovely as the Dordogne'
[25-12] Kissing under the Mistletoe?Not in Medieval Herefordshire
[10-08] Too late for #Christmas already?!?! #herefordshire #Food
[13-07] ⚠️ Can you help us locate #missing man with links to #Herefordshire and #Scotland? ⚠️ ➡️
[30-10] Just 2 more days until we're in Herefordshire for the final episode in the new series of #GrandDesigns? Wed 1st Nov, 9pm,
[26-07] Actually not just #birmingham how about #Worcestershire or #herefordshire any good folk I should see and write about thi
[28-08] No #HerefordHour #BankHolidayMonday 28/8. Hope you are all having a fabulous time! See you 4/9 at 1pm! #herefordshire
[05-08] @bbctms Enjoying you in Herefordshire with a rainbow and G&T for company. #England.
[12-08] Find out more about WorkShopHere here! It's all about art #work, #shop local, #here in Herefordshire
[20-12] Hard to believe this was our bridge just a week ago! #uksnow #snowday #Herefordshire
[30-10] Next week in #GrandDesigns? in our final episode of the new series we're off to Herefordshire, Don't miss it! Wed 1st Nov
[01-11] Ed and Rowena showing that #selfbuild is alive and well in #Herefordshire #Granddesigns @granddesignsmag
Herefordshire Folklore
Book by Roy Palmer
* there are two main avenues of interpreting the headcanon that lowbloods form groups that share an “ancestor” (it wouldn’t be called that, obviously, because lowbloods just explicitly don’t believe in those) those being a) it’s one of the symptoms of lowbloods spawning in huge numbers and being more community-oriented while highbloods are rare and individualistic and b) that it’s a result of historical omission of lowblood folklore and history; the process of systematically killing and stunting lowbloods before they can achieve greatness and then reducing those who do to mere footnotes resulting in a ludicrously disproportionate, nay, nigh-inversely proportionate ratio of highblood folklore heroes to lowblood folklore heroes
* #Play #Herefordshire
* #Seahawks #GoHawks (at Hereford, Herefordshire)
  • [12-01] Weather #folklore from my grandma, "If the river comes up and leaves ice, it will come back to get it."When you…
  • [12-01] Good afternoon #FolkloreThursday! @DeeDeeChainey here to take you through the next 90 minutes of #work folklore. Here's
    quara
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    Difference between “lore” and “folklore”
    What is the difference between lore and folklore? What are the best examples where to use one and not the other?
    Herefordshire Folklore
    Herefordshire
    Folklore
    Forums
    Why were rabbits associated with trickery in mythology and folklore?

    because they steal vegetables from gardens.
    Does anyone know anything about the folklore and history of Ettrick Forest near Selkirk in Scotland?

    William Wallace 'This is the truth I tell you: of all things freedom’s most fine. Never submit to live, my son, in the bonds of slavery entwined.’ William Wallace - His Uncle’s proverb, from Bower’s Scotichronicon c.1440’s The reputation of William Wallace runs like a fault line through later medieval chronicles. For the Scots, William Wallace was an exemplar of unbending commitment to Scotland’s independence who died a martyr to the cause. For centuries after its publication, Blind Harry’s 15th-century epic poem, ‘The Wallace’, was the second most popular book in Scotland after the Bible. For the English chroniclers he was an outlaw, a murderer, the perpetrator of atrocities and a traitor. How did an obscure Scot obtain such notoriety? Who was William Wallace? Wallace was the younger son of a Scottish knight and minor landowner. His name, Wallace or le Waleis, means the Welshman, and he was probably descended from Richard Wallace who had followed the Stewart family to Scotland in the 12th century. Little is known of Wallace’s life before 1297. He was certainly educated, possibly by his uncle - a priest at Dunipace - who taught him French and Latin. It’s also possible, given his later military exploits, that he had some previous military experience. Wallace’s Rising In 1296 Scotland had been conquered. Beneath the surface there were deep resentments. Many of the Scots nobles were imprisoned, they were punitively taxed and expected to serve King Edward I in his military campaigns against France. The flames of revolt spread across Scotland. In May 1297 Wallace slew William Heselrig, the English Sheriff of Lanark. Soon his rising gained momentum, as men ‘oppressed by the burden of servitude under the intolerable rule of English domination’ joined him ‘like a swarm of bees’. From his base in the Ettrick Forest his followers struck at Scone, Ancrum and Dundee. At the same time in the north, the young Andrew Murray led an even more successful rising. From Avoch in the Black Isle, he took Inverness and stormed Urquhart Castle by Loch Ness. His MacDougall allies cleared the west, whilst he struck through the north east. Wallace’s rising drew strength from the south, and, with most of Scotland liberated, Wallace and Murray now faced open battle with an English army. On 11th September Wallace and Murray achieved a stunning victory at the Battle of Stirling Bridge. The English left with 5,000 dead on the field, including their despised treasurer, Hugh Cressingham, whose flayed skin was taken as a trophy of victory and to make a belt for Wallace’s sword. The Scots suffered one significant casualty, Andrew Murray, who was badly wounded and died two months later. 'Commander of the Army of the Kingdom of Scotland’ - the outlaw Wallace was now knighted and made Guardian of Scotland in Balliol’s name at the forest kirk, at either Selkirk or Carluke. It was a remarkable achievement for a mere knight to hold power over the nobles of Scotland. In a medieval world obsessed with hierarchy, Wallace’s extraordinary military success catapulted him to the top of the social ladder. He now guided Scottish policy. Letters were dispatched to Europe proclaiming Scotland’s renewed independence and he managed to obtain from the Papacy the appointment of the patriotic Bishop Lamberton to the vacant Bishopric of St Andrews. Militarily he took the war into the north of England, raiding around Newcastle and wreaking havoc across the north. Contemporary English chroniclers accused him of atrocities, some no doubt warranted, however, in Wallace’s eyes the war, since its beginning, had been marked by brutality and butchery.
    William Wallace is the most obvious one that springs to mind.
    William Wallace 'This is the truth I tell you: of all things freedom’s most fine. Never submit to live, my son, in the bonds of slavery entwined.’ William Wallace - His Uncle’s proverb, from Bower’s Scotichronicon c.1440’s The reputation of William Wallace runs like a fault line through later medieval chronicles. For the Scots, William Wallace was an exemplar of unbending commitment to Scotland’s independence who died a martyr to the cause. For centuries after its publication, Blind Harry’s 15th-century epic poem, ‘The Wallace’, was the second most popular book in Scotland after the Bible. For the English chroniclers he was an outlaw, a murderer, the perpetrator of atrocities and a traitor. How did an obscure Scot obtain such notoriety? Who was William Wallace? Wallace was the younger son of a Scottish knight and minor landowner. His name, Wallace or le Waleis, means the Welshman, and he was probably descended from Richard Wallace who had followed the Stewart family to Scotland in the 12th century. Little is known of Wallace’s life before 1297. He was certainly educated, possibly by his uncle - a priest at Dunipace - who taught him French and Latin. It’s also possible, given his later military exploits, that he had some previous military experience. Wallace’s Rising In 1296 Scotland had been conquered. Beneath the surface there were deep resentments. Many of the Scots nobles were imprisoned, they were punitively taxed and expected to serve King Edward I in his military campaigns against France. The flames of revolt spread across Scotland. In May 1297 Wallace slew William Heselrig, the English Sheriff of Lanark. Soon his rising gained momentum, as men ‘oppressed by the burden of servitude under the intolerable rule of English domination’ joined him ‘like a swarm of bees’. From his base in the Ettrick Forest his followers struck at Scone, Ancrum and Dundee. At the same time in the north, the young Andrew Murray led an even more successful rising. From Avoch in the Black Isle, he took Inverness and stormed Urquhart Castle by Loch Ness. His MacDougall allies cleared the west, whilst he struck through the north east. Wallace’s rising drew strength from the south, and, with most of Scotland liberated, Wallace and Murray now faced open battle with an English army. On 11th September Wallace and Murray achieved a stunning victory at the Battle of Stirling Bridge. The English left with 5,000 dead on the field, including their despised treasurer, Hugh Cressingham, whose flayed skin was taken as a trophy of victory and to make a belt for Wallace’s sword. The Scots suffered one significant casualty, Andrew Murray, who was badly wounded and died two months later. 'Commander of the Army of the Kingdom of Scotland’ - the outlaw Wallace was now knighted and made Guardian of Scotland in Balliol’s name at the forest kirk, at either Selkirk or Carluke. It was a remarkable achievement for a mere knight to hold power over the nobles of Scotland. In a medieval world obsessed with hierarchy, Wallace’s extraordinary military success catapulted him to the top of the social ladder. He now guided Scottish policy. Letters were dispatched to Europe proclaiming Scotland’s renewed independence and he managed to obtain from the Papacy the appointment of the patriotic Bishop Lamberton to the vacant Bishopric of St Andrews. Militarily he took the war into the north of England, raiding around Newcastle and wreaking havoc across the north. Contemporary English chroniclers accused him of atrocities, some no doubt warranted, however, in Wallace’s eyes the war, since its beginning, had been marked by brutality and butchery.
    sen
    Traditional musical instruments are taught along with Bulgarian folklore singing, Serbian folklore singing, Bulgarian language, etc. Además, a los participantes se ofrecen clases de instrumentos musicales tradicionales, canto tradicional búlgaro, canto tradicional serbio, lengua búlgara, etc.
    We're in Herefordshire, they don't have them here anyway. Estamos en Herefordshire, que no tienen ellos aquí de todos modos.
    It would never be like Herefordshire. Nunca sería como Herefordshire.
    Never been outside of Herefordshire. Nunca salí de Herefordshire.