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Micmac Folklore

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Forums
Why were rabbits associated with trickery in mythology and folklore?
Does anyone know anything about the folklore and history of Ettrick Forest near Selkirk in Scotland?
What did the Micmac believed in?
What were micmac families like?
What was Micmac weathe rlike?
Did Micmac interact with Europeans?
How do you spell mom in the micmac language?
News
Red-hot rookie blazes into F1 folklore
Wallace surpasses family folklore
Brave Canvey can now pass into cup folklore
Heineken Cup: Pontypridd enter Welsh folklore
Ged Dalton enters Blyth Spartans folklore
Freddie Sears enters West Ham folklore
AC
What's the most interesting local folklore story/legend that you ever heard?
Halifax council to consider studying bacteria in Lake Banook, Lake Micmac
Sam Austin took his two kids to Birch Cove Beach at Lake Banook in Dartmouth, N.S., this summer, there was a problem he regularly encountered. "It felt like every other day, Birch Cove was open and then it was closed again," said the Dartmouth Centre councillor. The reason for the frequent closures was elevated bacteria levels.
Getting serious about folklore
The A to Z of Kannada folklore
Course in folklore studies
One-year course in folklore
Folklore Day to be observed
[21-09] @hodderscape I can't say for sure if I had a Micmac burial ground next to me I wouldn't be tempted to use it when s…
[02-12] Estudiar, y folklore @00_florencia una tarde muy diferente #Folklore #folklorethursday #folkloreArgentino
[09-12] #FolkloreThursday #Folklore I love @terriwindling ‘s site for all my folklore.
[30-10] 'Black Dog Folklore' by Mark Norman. A comprehensive study of the image of the Black Dog in folklore. #Devon #exeter #
[14-11] Five Legendary Islands from Folklore - #FolkloreThursday
[09-12] He is being hidden from the masses to keep this in folklore. #bbcintroducing
[02-12] The Kelpie of Scottish folklore... #FolkloreThursday
[14-10] #FridayThe13th ? Find out the Freaky #Folklore behind this Spooktacular day! ?
[04-12] Yum!@DeeDeeChainey is my favorite #FolkloreThursday mod.I will definitely pick this up when it comes out!#Folklore ht
[01-12] This, That and the Other: Folklore of the #ThreeRealms by @DeanAuthor for #FolkloreThursday #WorldTree
[12-12] Folklore in action!! This is such a cool project! #FolkloreThursday
[02-12] Family Folklore: How Stories Make Us Who We Are - #FolkloreThursday
[09-10] Viva Mexico y su folklore #BalletFolklorico #AmaliaHernandez…
[13-10] It's #WorldEggDay! Celebrate by reading all about the folklore of #eggs!
[09-11] #FolkloreThursday All folklore is local to someone - so for those of us in UK here's Herne the Hunter from 'Box of Del
[10-08] Was supposed to be a quite one before the “Morris dancers” showed up #UK folklore
[11-11] Miss #FolkloreThursday yesterday? Catch up on all the #folklore fun on our website!
[13-07] Breadalbane Folklore Centre, Killin #Scotland - in a former mill
Micmac Folklore
Book by Elsie Clews Parsons
* there are two main avenues of interpreting the headcanon that lowbloods form groups that share an “ancestor” (it wouldn’t be called that, obviously, because lowbloods just explicitly don’t believe in those) those being a) it’s one of the symptoms of lowbloods spawning in huge numbers and being more community-oriented while highbloods are rare and individualistic and b) that it’s a result of historical omission of lowblood folklore and history; the process of systematically killing and stunting lowbloods before they can achieve greatness and then reducing those who do to mere footnotes resulting in a ludicrously disproportionate, nay, nigh-inversely proportionate ratio of highblood folklore heroes to lowblood folklore heroes
* What is Gaelic Folklore? Image of a waulking taken from Wikimedia Commons. Dearest Reader, Now that I am at home with more time on my hands, I thought it time to put some blog posts together on ideas and cool things that I’ve been learning about. It’ll be a good way for me to review much of what I’ve been learning while sharing some interesting things. First on the list: Gaelic folklore! This is on my mind a lot since I… View On WordPress
* 21st Century Demonology – Part 4: Media Metaphysics & Shamanic Trances Addressed in this seriesthus far, were the occult origins and classifications of angels, demons, and preternatural entities; the folklore that ideas of these entities created throughout ancient and classical society, as well as the possible inspiration for some of today’s surviving folklore; and the modern scientific studies that fit surprisingly well with these older ideas, from quantum physics… View On WordPress
  • [12-01] Weather #folklore from my grandma, "If the river comes up and leaves ice, it will come back to get it."When you…
  • [12-01] Good afternoon #FolkloreThursday! @DeeDeeChainey here to take you through the next 90 minutes of #work folklore. Here's
    quara
    Which ghosts were based on folklore?
    On Accio Quote, the point is made that: JKR speaks of researching specific ghosts, implying that one or more of the Hogwarts ghosts are based on ghosts from folklore. Do we know whether any ...
    Difference between “lore” and “folklore”
    What is the difference between lore and folklore? What are the best examples where to use one and not the other?
    Micmac Folklore
    Folklore
    Micmac
    Forums
    Why were rabbits associated with trickery in mythology and folklore?

    because they steal vegetables from gardens.
    Does anyone know anything about the folklore and history of Ettrick Forest near Selkirk in Scotland?

    William Wallace 'This is the truth I tell you: of all things freedom’s most fine. Never submit to live, my son, in the bonds of slavery entwined.’ William Wallace - His Uncle’s proverb, from Bower’s Scotichronicon c.1440’s The reputation of William Wallace runs like a fault line through later medieval chronicles. For the Scots, William Wallace was an exemplar of unbending commitment to Scotland’s independence who died a martyr to the cause. For centuries after its publication, Blind Harry’s 15th-century epic poem, ‘The Wallace’, was the second most popular book in Scotland after the Bible. For the English chroniclers he was an outlaw, a murderer, the perpetrator of atrocities and a traitor. How did an obscure Scot obtain such notoriety? Who was William Wallace? Wallace was the younger son of a Scottish knight and minor landowner. His name, Wallace or le Waleis, means the Welshman, and he was probably descended from Richard Wallace who had followed the Stewart family to Scotland in the 12th century. Little is known of Wallace’s life before 1297. He was certainly educated, possibly by his uncle - a priest at Dunipace - who taught him French and Latin. It’s also possible, given his later military exploits, that he had some previous military experience. Wallace’s Rising In 1296 Scotland had been conquered. Beneath the surface there were deep resentments. Many of the Scots nobles were imprisoned, they were punitively taxed and expected to serve King Edward I in his military campaigns against France. The flames of revolt spread across Scotland. In May 1297 Wallace slew William Heselrig, the English Sheriff of Lanark. Soon his rising gained momentum, as men ‘oppressed by the burden of servitude under the intolerable rule of English domination’ joined him ‘like a swarm of bees’. From his base in the Ettrick Forest his followers struck at Scone, Ancrum and Dundee. At the same time in the north, the young Andrew Murray led an even more successful rising. From Avoch in the Black Isle, he took Inverness and stormed Urquhart Castle by Loch Ness. His MacDougall allies cleared the west, whilst he struck through the north east. Wallace’s rising drew strength from the south, and, with most of Scotland liberated, Wallace and Murray now faced open battle with an English army. On 11th September Wallace and Murray achieved a stunning victory at the Battle of Stirling Bridge. The English left with 5,000 dead on the field, including their despised treasurer, Hugh Cressingham, whose flayed skin was taken as a trophy of victory and to make a belt for Wallace’s sword. The Scots suffered one significant casualty, Andrew Murray, who was badly wounded and died two months later. 'Commander of the Army of the Kingdom of Scotland’ - the outlaw Wallace was now knighted and made Guardian of Scotland in Balliol’s name at the forest kirk, at either Selkirk or Carluke. It was a remarkable achievement for a mere knight to hold power over the nobles of Scotland. In a medieval world obsessed with hierarchy, Wallace’s extraordinary military success catapulted him to the top of the social ladder. He now guided Scottish policy. Letters were dispatched to Europe proclaiming Scotland’s renewed independence and he managed to obtain from the Papacy the appointment of the patriotic Bishop Lamberton to the vacant Bishopric of St Andrews. Militarily he took the war into the north of England, raiding around Newcastle and wreaking havoc across the north. Contemporary English chroniclers accused him of atrocities, some no doubt warranted, however, in Wallace’s eyes the war, since its beginning, had been marked by brutality and butchery.
    William Wallace is the most obvious one that springs to mind.
    William Wallace 'This is the truth I tell you: of all things freedom’s most fine. Never submit to live, my son, in the bonds of slavery entwined.’ William Wallace - His Uncle’s proverb, from Bower’s Scotichronicon c.1440’s The reputation of William Wallace runs like a fault line through later medieval chronicles. For the Scots, William Wallace was an exemplar of unbending commitment to Scotland’s independence who died a martyr to the cause. For centuries after its publication, Blind Harry’s 15th-century epic poem, ‘The Wallace’, was the second most popular book in Scotland after the Bible. For the English chroniclers he was an outlaw, a murderer, the perpetrator of atrocities and a traitor. How did an obscure Scot obtain such notoriety? Who was William Wallace? Wallace was the younger son of a Scottish knight and minor landowner. His name, Wallace or le Waleis, means the Welshman, and he was probably descended from Richard Wallace who had followed the Stewart family to Scotland in the 12th century. Little is known of Wallace’s life before 1297. He was certainly educated, possibly by his uncle - a priest at Dunipace - who taught him French and Latin. It’s also possible, given his later military exploits, that he had some previous military experience. Wallace’s Rising In 1296 Scotland had been conquered. Beneath the surface there were deep resentments. Many of the Scots nobles were imprisoned, they were punitively taxed and expected to serve King Edward I in his military campaigns against France. The flames of revolt spread across Scotland. In May 1297 Wallace slew William Heselrig, the English Sheriff of Lanark. Soon his rising gained momentum, as men ‘oppressed by the burden of servitude under the intolerable rule of English domination’ joined him ‘like a swarm of bees’. From his base in the Ettrick Forest his followers struck at Scone, Ancrum and Dundee. At the same time in the north, the young Andrew Murray led an even more successful rising. From Avoch in the Black Isle, he took Inverness and stormed Urquhart Castle by Loch Ness. His MacDougall allies cleared the west, whilst he struck through the north east. Wallace’s rising drew strength from the south, and, with most of Scotland liberated, Wallace and Murray now faced open battle with an English army. On 11th September Wallace and Murray achieved a stunning victory at the Battle of Stirling Bridge. The English left with 5,000 dead on the field, including their despised treasurer, Hugh Cressingham, whose flayed skin was taken as a trophy of victory and to make a belt for Wallace’s sword. The Scots suffered one significant casualty, Andrew Murray, who was badly wounded and died two months later. 'Commander of the Army of the Kingdom of Scotland’ - the outlaw Wallace was now knighted and made Guardian of Scotland in Balliol’s name at the forest kirk, at either Selkirk or Carluke. It was a remarkable achievement for a mere knight to hold power over the nobles of Scotland. In a medieval world obsessed with hierarchy, Wallace’s extraordinary military success catapulted him to the top of the social ladder. He now guided Scottish policy. Letters were dispatched to Europe proclaiming Scotland’s renewed independence and he managed to obtain from the Papacy the appointment of the patriotic Bishop Lamberton to the vacant Bishopric of St Andrews. Militarily he took the war into the north of England, raiding around Newcastle and wreaking havoc across the north. Contemporary English chroniclers accused him of atrocities, some no doubt warranted, however, in Wallace’s eyes the war, since its beginning, had been marked by brutality and butchery.
    sen
    Sebastian cabot, who spent the winter here in 1497. With the local Micmac Indians. Sebastian Cabot, que pasó aquí el invierno de 1497 con los indios nativos Micmac.
    Traditional musical instruments are taught along with Bulgarian folklore singing, Serbian folklore singing, Bulgarian language, etc. Además, a los participantes se ofrecen clases de instrumentos musicales tradicionales, canto tradicional búlgaro, canto tradicional serbio, lengua búlgara, etc.
    Always the folklore, with this Antillais... Siempre el folklore, con este Antillais...
    He's interested in primitive folklore. El profesor está interesado en el folklore primitivo.
    MICMAC SOLUTIONS LIMITED
    1 Sunnyside Lane, Drumoak, Banchory, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, AB31 5EJ